Joshua Kissi :  We are proud to announce in collaboration with Visual Supply Company (VSCO) our latest short film editorial titled SLUMFLOWER. This time around we had the pleasure of presenting the editorial in gallery exhibition form and invited tons of supporters somewhere between 2,500-3,000  people came out to experience the editorial in realtime.

In collaboration with VSCO we released a limited edition preset bundle that can be downloaded in the store section of the app, printed books of the editorial which is for sale in our online web store and also a special photographer’s edition by Rog Walker. We want to sincerely thank everyone who came out to the event in support of the short film editorial, and we can’t wait until the film is finished !

CLICK HERE TO VIEW SLUMFLOWER

CLICK HERE TO VIEW SLUMFLOWER

CLICK HERE TO VIEW SLUMFLOWER

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Artist Statement ///

SLUMFLOWER started out as a seed idea that we had about two years ago, about the misconceptions formed about public housing. The story is centered around a 10-year old boy finding beauty and growth in the midst of concrete.

Growing up watching video like Spike Lee’s “Clockers” (1995) or Nas’ “Nas is like” (1999)  I’m positive SLUMFLOWER wasn’t the image urban planner Robert Moses had in mind while planning the design and placement of public housing during 1950s New York City.

People tend to say that fashion, though artistically driven, is simply surface and incapable of expressing anything socially or politically mind bending – that the fashion lens puts a hyper focus on just looks and consumerism. We like to think an editorial like this provides an alternative to that idea.

It’s always been a mission of ours to tell a story through our editorials and brand – preferably one people haven’t heard of before. We were perfectly aware that the sight of twenty some odd immaculately dressed gentleman – and a baby faced cute kid – would lure people in. At the end of the editorial – and eventually the film – there are obvious questions to be asked, statements to be made, conversations to be had with varying opinions. But I guess that’s what art and creation is all about.

Founded in 2008 by Joshua Kissi & Travis Gumbs, Street Etiquette showcases style using a cultural, historical and urban perspective.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW SLUMFLOWER

CLICK HERE TO VIEW SLUMFLOWER

CLICK HERE TO VIEW SLUMFLOWER

 

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